Critical Thinking In Chemistry

Critical Thinking In Chemistry-73
You get concentrations of metals in waste streams that are higher than the ores they are coming from.’ Magnetic attraction The rare earth elements (REEs) - the fifteen lanthanides, plus scandium and yttrium - are being consumed at alarming rates, partly to feed our obsession with the latest must-have technology.’The real gift of the rare earths has been miniaturisation,’ says Jack Lifton, who runs a US consultancy called Technology Metals Research.Formulate a thesis/hypothesis that takes into account the complexity of an issue/problem and the variety of perspectives on this issue 5.

You get concentrations of metals in waste streams that are higher than the ores they are coming from.’ Magnetic attraction The rare earth elements (REEs) - the fifteen lanthanides, plus scandium and yttrium - are being consumed at alarming rates, partly to feed our obsession with the latest must-have technology.’The real gift of the rare earths has been miniaturisation,’ says Jack Lifton, who runs a US consultancy called Technology Metals Research.

The elements used in the magnets - neodymium, dysprosium and terbium - are in short supply and the west is in danger of losing access to them as China’s domestic needs soar.

Unfortunately, the green future of the UK and much of Europe also relies heavily on wind turbines rich in rare earths.

And it’s not just green technology that is under threat - many of our everyday electronic items, from i Phones to LCD televisions, depend on the same critical elements.

Rare earths are not the only elements causing supply concerns - elements such as helium (see Balloon about to burst?

The country is constructing wind farms on an unprecedented scale - surely good news given its insatiable appetite for coal.

But each megawatt of power a wind turbine generates requires up to one tonne of rare earth permanent magnets.

published in 2010, identified 14 raw materials and metal groups, including all of the rare earth and platinum group metals, as well as antimony, beryllium, cobalt, fluorspar, gallium, germanium, graphite, indium, magnesium, niobium, tantalum, and tungsten.

The expert group that compiled the report would like to see ’policy actions’ to make recycling more efficient and is keen to promote research into recycling ’technically challenging’ products.

Access to society journal content varies across our titles.

If you have access to a journal via a society or association membership, please browse to your society journal, select an article to view, and follow the instructions in this box.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Critical Thinking In Chemistry

The Latest from betonprim.ru ©