Essay Ancient Topography Jerusalem

Essay Ancient Topography Jerusalem-83
Upon these immense stone blocks, lying at that depth upon a rocky foundation, there were discovered Phoenician quarrymarks.The shafts sunk by Captains Warren and Wilson have since been filled up, and Jerusalem topography is still confused by the mazes of many conflicting opinions. Fergusson, in Smith's Dictionary, which would identify Zion with the hill on which the temple stood, has been generally rejected by scholars. If the probatika of John 5:2 be the sheep-gate, and the Pool of Bethesda be the Fountain of the Virgin, with its intermittent flow, then we should suppose the sheep-gate to be farther south; but the Pool of Bethesda may have been within the temple-precinct, and the present Fountain of the Virgin may receive to-day the intermittent effects which in former times showed themselves in another pool, now filled up.

Upon these immense stone blocks, lying at that depth upon a rocky foundation, there were discovered Phoenician quarrymarks.The shafts sunk by Captains Warren and Wilson have since been filled up, and Jerusalem topography is still confused by the mazes of many conflicting opinions. Fergusson, in Smith's Dictionary, which would identify Zion with the hill on which the temple stood, has been generally rejected by scholars. If the probatika of John 5:2 be the sheep-gate, and the Pool of Bethesda be the Fountain of the Virgin, with its intermittent flow, then we should suppose the sheep-gate to be farther south; but the Pool of Bethesda may have been within the temple-precinct, and the present Fountain of the Virgin may receive to-day the intermittent effects which in former times showed themselves in another pool, now filled up.Even the location of Zion and Moriah has been disputed with great ability and learning.

Tags: Gothic Frankenstein EssayEssays On Good HealthHow To Improve Problem SolvingReflective Essay On Personal Development PlanWhat Makes You Happy In Life EssayTolkien Essay Of BeowulfCritical Thinking PodcastExamples Of Dissertation TopicsIt HomeworkSmall Essay On Journey By Train

42, and therefore after the crucifixion and ascension of Christ.

All the three walls noticed by Josephus are upon the north of the upper city, or Zion, but there is much controversy respecting the course of these walls, particularly the second and the third wall.

By this watergate, on Ophel, was a broad street or square, where assemblies could be held in the immediate vicinity of the temple. Near by was the 'horsegate,' famous as the spot where Athaliah was put to death. The position of these walls is one of the disputed questions in Jerusalem topography.

In reconstructing the city as it appeared in our Lord's day the reader must remember that the third wall, which enclosed the new city, Bezetha, on the north, was built by Herod Agrippa, about a.d.

Warren's subterranean explorations (Recovery of Jerusalem, p. As he himself suggests, it may have been built out in order to guard the fountain of the Virgin. The gate 'Miphkad ' may mark some angle of the walls connected with the division, as a special corner is here mentioned, Neh , before we reach the sheepgate again." The next important view of Jerusalem topography is that during our Lord's day, and until its destruction by the Romans, a.d. The only full description of the city near that date which has come down to us is found in Josephus.

Essay Ancient Topography Jerusalem

The 'water-gate' would be so called in relation to this fountain. The city was defended on the east, south, and west by a single wall; upon the north three walls were successively built, the second outside of the first, and the third outside of the second.These places we must, of course, find in the templeregion. Between the fish-gate and the sheep-gate would stand the tower of Hananeel and the tower of Meah (or the Hundred). The 'valley-gate' would correspond with the present Jaffa-gate. The 'dung-gate' (if our suppositions above are correct) would be 1000 cubits south of the Jaffa-gate, Neh -- that is, on the south-western part of Zion, over against the Birket es-Sultan (Pool of the Sultan).The 'old gate' would be found next as we follow the north wall north-westward. The 'fountain-gate' would lie on the opposite side of Zion, facing the Pool of Siloam.The descriptions of the relationship between Jews and Greeks lead to a fuller discussion of social, theological, and political factors that are not considered in the earlier narrative.Jerusalem under Herod and the city of the New Testament receive the most substantial treatment in this volume, with the author drawing on a wide range of sources from Talmudic literature to a range of classical sources.A brief statement of the general divisions and features of Jerusalem has already been given under Physical Features, p. The lower eastern hill, known as Mount Moriah, is the site of Solomon's temple; west of it was the higher hill of Zion, called also the city of David. The description in Nehemiah follows the wall from the centre of the east side of the city northward. We are inclined to think that this sheepgate is the same as the Mishneh, or 'second gate,' of Zeph , and the 'college' of 2 Kgs , where the prophetess Huldah lived. The 'gate of Ephraim' comes next in Nehemiah (not in his account of the building, but in his record of the dedication, Neh ), and may have occupied the site of the present Damascus gate.Bezetha was on the north of Zion, according to Josephus. -- As the walls of the old city rebuilt by Nehemiah were, it is believed, upon the old foundations, the city, as renovated after the great captivity; must have been upon the same site, and have covered nearly the same area as the Jerusalem of David and Solomon. Howard Crosby, in Johnson's Cyclopedia, says of the city as restored by Nehemiah: "Eliashib the high priest is first mentioned as leading the workers at the sheep-gate, and at the wall as far as the tower of the Hundred (Ho Meah) and the tower of Hananeel. The sheep-gate must have been in the centre of the temple-precinct wall. In this case the fish-gate would be the first gate (see Zeph ), and would represent the north-eastern corner of the city, opposite the Mount of Olives. Then follows the 'broad wall' (some local peculiarities of the wall, perhaps for defence), and then we reach the 'Tower of the Furnaces,' which may have stood over the western valley, as the towers of Hananeel and the Hundred overlooked the eastern.Economics and politics form the focus of the second book, with the interaction between the temple revenues, trades, crafts, and industries given significance.Volume I ends with a chapter about the government of the city from the earliest evidence until direct Roman rule.The first book covers the topography of the city, its position and nomenclature, and some notes on climate.Smith draws on the Biblical evidence to illustrate the positions of various sites, such as Zion or the City of David, and the history and location of the system of walls are described.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Essay Ancient Topography Jerusalem

The Latest from betonprim.ru ©