Fallen Angel Essay

Fallen Angel Essay-43
During his time at Mack Sennett’s Keystone Studios in 1914, Chaplin had moved from simply acting in films to directing them.In a few brief years, his movies grew from less than half an hour in length to an hour or more.The truth is that The Kid reveals how closely Chaplin’s irreverent slapstick could be intertwined with his sentiment.

During his time at Mack Sennett’s Keystone Studios in 1914, Chaplin had moved from simply acting in films to directing them.In a few brief years, his movies grew from less than half an hour in length to an hour or more.The truth is that The Kid reveals how closely Chaplin’s irreverent slapstick could be intertwined with his sentiment.

Characteristically, he is entirely indifferent to questions of belief and unbelief; rather, Bloom prefers to treat the great Western religions as a series of “literary representations”.

This means that Satan, the fallen angel par excellence, the “star figure” in this story, was a “literary character” long before Milton got his hands on him in .

Of course, this invites the question: why talk about “fallenness” at all, unless some of those theological associations in fact remain in play?

Bloom’s answer, I suppose, would be that he talks like that because, for all his disdain for Saints Paul and Augustine, he still believes in redemption.

If, on Bloom’s account, Milton’s literary genius is outstripped by Shakespeare’s, it is because Shakespeare sees that there are more fallen angels than devils, that “we can be fallen angels without being demons or devils.” For Bloom, therefore, “fallen angel” and “human being” are different names for the same condition.

In his secular religion of literature, fallenness is stripped of its Pauline and Augustinian associations and becomes a synonym for what Philip Roth calls the “human stain” – the fact that, more often than not, we remain enigmatic to ourselves; simply put, the fact that we get things (and people) wrong.

How does Fallen Angels address matters of race and class in America?

What is the significance of his longtime inability to write an honest letter?

As the title suggests, it’s ostensibly about angels, but turns out to be about what Bloom’s books are usually about – that is, and in no particular order, the genius of Shakespeare, the Bible as literature and the saving, redemptive power of reading.

America, Bloom begins by arguing, is in the grip of a “post-millenial” obsession with angels.

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