What Is Madison'S Thesis In Federalist No 51

What Is Madison'S Thesis In Federalist No 51-37
For in politics, as in religion, it is equally absurd to aim at making proselytes by fire and sword. Were there not even these inducements to moderation, nothing could be more ill-judged than that intolerant spirit which has, at all times, characterized political parties. I shall not, however, multiply professions on this head.

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And yet, however just these sentiments will be allowed to be, we have already sufficient indications that it will happen in this as in all former cases of great national discussion.

Heresies in either can rarely be cured by persecution.

It has until lately been a received and uncontradicted opinion that the prosperity of the people of America depended on their continuing firmly united, and the wishes, prayers, and efforts of our best and wisest citizens have been constantly directed to that object.

It is well worthy of consideration therefore, whether it would conduce more to the interest of the people of America that they should, to all general purposes, be one nation, under one federal government, or that they should divide themselves into separate confederacies, and give to the head of each the same kind of powers which they are advised to place in one national government.

The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles FEDERALIST No. On the Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained. It may perhaps be thought superfluous to offer arguments to prove the utility of the UNION, a point, no doubt, deeply engraved on the hearts of the great body of the people in every State, and one, which it may be imagined, has no adversaries.

General View of the Powers Conferred by The Constitution FEDERALIST No. The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered) FEDERALIST No. Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States FEDERALIST No. The Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments. In the progress of this discussion I shall endeavor to give a satisfactory answer to all the objections which shall have made their appearance, that may seem to have any claim to your attention.

Ambition, avarice, personal animosity, party opposition, and many other motives not more laudable than these, are apt to operate as well upon those who support as those who oppose the right side of a question.

The Executive Department Further Considered FEDERALIST No. The Duration in Office of the Executive FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered. And a further reason for caution, in this respect, might be drawn from the reflection that we are not always sure that those who advocate the truth are influenced by purer principles than their antagonists.

Nothing is more certain than the indispensable necessity of government, and it is equally undeniable, that whenever and however it is instituted, the people must cede to it some of their natural rights in order to vest it with requisite powers.

Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence) FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence) FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence) FEDERALIST No. Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States) FEDERALIST No. The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States FEDERALIST No. The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection) FEDERALIST No. The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy FEDERALIST No. The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue FEDERALIST No. Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government FEDERALIST No. Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered FEDERALIST No. The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union) FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union) FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union) FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union) FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union) FEDERALIST No. Other Defects of the Present Confederation FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (Other Defects of the Present Confederation) FEDERALIST No. The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union FEDERALIST No. The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered FEDERALIST No. The Same Subject Continued (The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered) FEDERALIST No. The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered. JAY To the People of the State of New York: WHEN the people of America reflect that they are now called upon to decide a question, which, in its consequences, must prove one of the most important that ever engaged their attention, the propriety of their taking a very comprehensive, as well as a very serious, view of it, will be evident.

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